Sad Love Stories – Losing a Life Partner

 

LOVE! It’s the source of our greatest happiness, our deepest well of strength, and our ultimate reason for persevering. Only in love do we find completion, and with it, our life needs no other meaning. But, as great philosophers have written, ‘the end of all things is contained in their beginning.’ Even the greatest loves must come to an end,  and all lovers are eventually parted. While these sad love stories describe unspeakable loss, Love itself survives. That is their lesson.

 

“Death ends a life, not a relationship.” —Jack Lemmon

 

Richie recounts losing Karen during the attacks of September 11, 2001 .

 

 

The moment Andrea and her fiance Tom accepted his imminent passing.

Sad Love Stories Tom and Andrea

 

“We had a sixty-three year honeymoon.” Paul describes a lifetime with Wilma.

Sad Love Stories - Paul Wilson

 

Losing a life partner is the ‘secret’ devastating life event that every relationship must endure. While it is a trial for the survivor, even death cannot sever the connection between soul-mates. We may grieve our loss, but we can also recognize our partner in the everyday world around us. We can laugh at the world through their sense of humor, honor their favorite things, and preserve their memory through friends and loved ones. How successfully we accept this event can be managed through life-long practice, preparation, and honest conversation in advance. After all, what greater gift could you give or be left with?

If you enjoyed these sad love stories, we encourage you take a closer look at StoryCorps. Started in 2003, StoryCorps is a collection of personal stories recorded in audio-only format at locations all across America. It is the largest project of its kind ever undertaken. The collection now contains many thousands of amazing stories, the cultural significance of which is so profound that it is preserved for posterity within the Library of Congress archives. Dive deep into StoryCorps, and we guarantee you will gain profound insight into our common humanity, and our shared hopes, joys, concerns, and struggles.

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